WPA Today   

Across America 2



WPA Poster

Across America 2
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Above:
Exhibit AA-11a.  Johnson County Courthouse: Wrightsville, Georgia.  This building was built in 1895 and then restored by the WPA in 1940.  (Photo by S. MacPherson, used with permission)
 



Above: Exhibit AA-11b.  Johnson County Courthouse: Wrightsville, Georgia (cont'd).  An information plaque on the building.  (Photo by S. MacPherson, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit AA-12a.  Worth County Courthouse: Northwood, Iowa.  This building was built in 1893 and then restored or improved by the WPA in 1938.  (Photo by S. MacPherson, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit AA-12b.  Worth County Courthouse: Northwood, Iowa (cont'd).  A WPA plaque on the building.  (Photo by S. MacPherson, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit AA-13.  Wakefield Library: Wakefield, Kansas.  This building appears to have been built by the WPA in 1938.  When constructing buildings, the WPA usually made use of local materials--in this case, limestone.  Thus, the WPA not only hired people who needed jobs, but also bought local products, which aided local businesses. (Photo by Tony Baca, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit AA-14a.  Abbott-Liekam Memorial Mausoleum: Chester, Massachusetts.  This building was built by the WPA in 1935 to 1936.  (Photo by S. MacPherson)


Above: Exhibit AA-14b.  Abbott-Liekam Memorial Mausoleum: Chester, Massachusetts (cont'd).  (Photo by S. MacPherson)

 
Above: Exhibit AA-15.  Lightness Dispelling Darkness.  The WPA put artists to work too.  This amazing statue is located in Roosevelt Park in Edison, New Jersey, and was made in 1937.  (Photo by Eric Milask)


Above: Exhibit AA-16.  Cove Creek High School: Sugar Grove, North Carolina.  This building--now home to some non-profit organizations--is yet another example of the great architectural style used by the WPA.  (Photo by Mark David Persons, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit AA-17a.  Pedestrian Tunnel: El Reno, Oklahoma.  Some WPA-created structures seem to exist at random locations, without much (or any) explanatory information...almost like ghosts from some bygone era.  This tunnel was built in 1936.  (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit AA-17b.  Pedestrian Tunnel: El Reno, Oklahoma (cont'd).  Unfortunately, this interesting structure appears to be in a state of substantial disrepair and neglect.  (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit AA-17c.  Pedestrian Tunnel: El Reno, Oklahoma (cont'd).  (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission)



Above: Exhibit AA-18.
  WPA Video.  The following video was produced by the WPA and, thus, is obviously not an unbiased documentary.  Still, it gives a great overview of the WPA's work across America.  The video is 35:28 long.  (Video courtesy of the Internet Archive)


Above: Exhibit AA-19a.  Bridge in Garfield County, Oklahoma.  The WPA built, repaired, and improved many bridges across the country.  (Photo by Sharon Thompson, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit AA-19b.  Bridge in Garfield County, Oklahoma (cont'd).  (Photo by Sharon Thompson, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit 20a.  Gracelawn Cemetery Wall: Edmond, Oklahoma.  The WPA asked local communities what needed to be done in their towns.  Here, the WPA built a wall separating the cemetery from the roadway.  (Photo by Sharon Thompson, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit 20b.  Gracelawn Cemetery Wall:  Edmond, Oklahoma (cont'd).  A WPA plaque on the cemetery wall. (Photo by Sharon Thompson, used with permission)

Go to page 3 of Across America exhibits

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