WPA Today   

Across America 3



WPA Poster

Across America 3
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Above: Exhibit AA-21a.  Timberline Lodge: Mount Hood Oregon.  The Timberline Lodge--a vacation resort--is one of the more elaborate of the WPA projects.  It was constructed from 1936 to 1938.  (Photo by Janell Brown, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit AA-21b.  Timberline Lodge: Mount Hood Oregon (cont'd).  (Photo by Janell Brown, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit 22a.  Joseph Wood Hill Park: Portland Oregon.  In 1936, this park was improved by the WPA.  (Photo by S. MacPherson, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit 22b.  Joseph Wood Hill Park: Portland Oregon (cont'd).  (Photo by S. MacPherson, used with permission)

Above: Exhibit 23.  Public Works Administration MapHistoryNYC.com offers a nice, large poster of the above image, showing PWA projects across the country.  Remember that the PWA was not primarily concerned with hiring the unemployed (as was the WPA), but rather in funding large public works projects; with the goals of improving the nation's infrastructure and curtailing employer layoffs.  Such public works programs also, obviously, involved some hiring of the jobless too.  Projects highlighted on the poster include the "Overseas Highway to the Florida Keys," the "Allegheny General Hospital" in Pittsburgh, the "Boulder Dam" (now known as the Hoover Dam), and a "Municipal Power Plant" in McPherson, Kansas.


Above: Exhibit 24a.  Municipal Pool: San Angelo, Texas.  Constructing and/or improving recreational areas/facilities was high on the WPA's "to-do" list.  (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit 24b.  Municipal Pool: San Angelo, Texas (cont'd).  WPA plaque.  (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit 25a.  Gazebo: Cooper, Texas.  The WPA built this structure sometime between 1938 and 1940.  (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit 25b.  Gazebo: Cooper, Texas (cont'd).  WPA plaque near the Gazebo.  (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit 26a.  Post Office Mural: Brownfield, Texas.  Many amazing murals were painted during the New Deal era (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission).  (Image used for educational, non-commercial, and non-profit making purposes. Copyright, United States Postal Service.  All rights reserved.)


Above: Exhibit 26b.  Post Office Mural: Brownfield, Texas (cont'd).  Information plaque for the mural.  (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission)  (Image used for educational, non-commercial, and non-profit making purposes. Copyright, United States Postal Service.  All rights reserved.)


Above: Exhibit 27a.  Oaklawn Elementary School: Fort Worth, Texas.  The WPA helped build this school, as it did hundreds of others across America.  (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission)


Above: Exhibit 27b.  Oaklawn Elementary School: Fort Worth, Texas (cont'd).  WPA plaque in front of the school. (Photo by Greg Galban, used with permission)


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Above: Exhibit 28.  Capitol Murals: Salt Lake City, Utah.  It's not clear if these murals were created by WPA artists, or by artists commissioned with PWA funds.  (Photo courtesy of Utah State Capitol Visitors Services Center)

   
Above: Exhibit AA-29.  U.S. Naval Reserve Armory: Seattle, Washington.  The WPA helped build this armory from 1940-1942; the armory is an excellent example of how the WPA assisted America's national defense before and during World War II.  (Photo by Mark David Persons, used with permission)


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Above: Exhibit AA-30a.  WPA work documentation.  A WPA notice to report to work on a sewer project in Yazoo City, Mississippi.  (Image provided by Marie Martinez)


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Above: Exhibit AA-30b.  WPA work documentation (cont'd).  Another "Report to Work" form.  (Image provided by Marie Martinez)


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Above: Exhibit AA-30c.  WPA work documentation (cont'd).  This time, the worker is to be employed on an armory project.  As World War II progressed, more and more WPA workers were diverted to defense-related jobs.  This work notice is interesting because it is near the end of the existence of the WPA, in 1943.  (Image provided by Marie Martinez)


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Above:
Exhibit AA-30d.  WPA work documentation (cont'd).  The dreaded pink slip.  This worker has been "pink-slipped" due to a "Reduction in Project Personnel."  Apparently, pink colored notices of termination were used before the WPA, but the WPA's use of "pink slips" entered the term into our permanent vocabulary.  Note: One of the criticisms of the WPA was that workers were let go to soon, and budgets reduced too often, thus not allowing for the full effect of Keynesian economics to combat the Great Depression.  (Image provided by Marie Martinez)

Go to page 4 of the Across America exhibits.

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